75 Ball Bingo Rules And How To Play Guide

How to Play 75-Ball Bingo

75-Ball Bingo is the most common way to play bingo, based on the traditional North American version of the game. Introduced on a national scale in the 1930’s by toy manufacturer Edwin Lowe, 75-Ball Bingo is easily one of the most popular games among all age groups in the United States and beyond.

It’s not hard to learn how to play 75-Ball Bingo. So long as you can read numbers, you can play. 75-Ball Bingo is a game of sheer luck, with no real skill involved.

How to Play 75-Ball Bingo: Numbers

75-Ball Bingo is played with balls number 1-75, generally drawn randomly from a machine that uses a puff of air to bring one ball to the surface at a time. Other 75-Ball Bingo games involve an electronic number drawing, where a software program uses an RNG (random number generator) to select each number at random.

The numbers are displayed on a screen, made clearly visible to all players.

How to Play 75-Ball Bingo: Cards

A 75-Ball Bingo card is made up of 25 squares in a 5×5 grid. The very center square is the Free Space, marked “FREE”. This square is instantly marked off to assist in the completion of whatever 75-Ball Bingo pattern you might be playing. (See “How to Play 75-Ball Bingo: Patterns” below)

There are 5 columns down, each labeled with a letter; B-I-N-G-O. Each column will contain 5 random numbers (or 4 numbers in the case of the N column, because of the Free Space) within a 15-number range. The first column, the B, can only contain numbers ranging from 1-15; the I column 16-30; the N column 31-45; the G column 46-60; the O column 61-75.

How to Play 75-Ball Bingo: Patterns

The biggest difference between 75-Ball Bingo and its European cousin, 90-Ball Bingo, is the presence of pattern bingo games. Because the 75-Ball Bingo card has a 5×5 grid of random numbers, there are hundreds of patterns that can be applied. These include numbers, letters and shapes, like the coffee mug, umbrella or airplane, as well as things like 4-corners and coverall bingo.

Coverall is often played as a jackpot bingo game with bigger prizes on the line. The players must cover every single square on their bingo card to win.

How to Play 75-Ball Bingo: Playing the Game

To play 75-Ball Bingo, make sure you are first aware of the bingo pattern being played (it should be displayed on or next to the screen where the numbers are shown). Each time a number is called, the player looks over his/her card(s) for that number. For example, if B-13 is called, players look in the B column for a 13.

Whenever a called numbers appears on the card, it is daubed with a foam-tip marker, called a dauber.

How to Play 75-Ball Bingo: Winning

To win a game of 75-Ball Bingo, all you have to do is complete the bingo pattern being played on a single bingo card. Once all numbers within that pattern have been daubed, shout “Bingo!” the first person to correctly daub the complete pattern and shout “Bingo!” win the game.

How to Play 75-Ball Bingo: Online Bingo

Playing 75-Ball Bingo online is much easier than the live version, though it doesn’t really get your heart racing in the same manner. This is because players are not required to really do anything. An Auto-Daub feature can be used to instantly mark off all bingo cards, and the software even calls “Bingo!” for the winner(s) automatically. You can turn off Auto-daub to have a more realistic live bingo experience.

Most players choose to keep the Auto-Daub feature on because it allows them to participate in the online bingo chat, or play side games like slots, video poker and other casino style games. This helps break the monotony of a standard 75-Ball Bingo game with a more entertaining distraction, especially for avid online bingo players.

Badugi Rules and Strategy

Rules

Badugi, traditionally played in Asia, is gaining more and more popularity in Europe and the United States with the help of online poker. No books have been published yet about the game, the usual poker writers haven’t shared their secrets of the game so far. So, here is the perfect opportunity to learn.

If you have some knowledge, like majority of beginners, about Texas Hold’em and Omaha then Badugi will be completely different from those games you have played before. It’s a draw poker type of game where the best hand contains four different suits and the lowest one is the winning combination. Aces are always low, so the best Badugi hand is A-2-3-4 of four different suits. If you do not have four different suits then the lowest in three different suits is your best hand (no badugi). A-2-3 is a fairly strong hand, which in many situations is able to win a showdown. If during the draw, your hand is A-2-3 and everyone else is drawing, you still have the best hand, so be aggressive.

Before the Deal

Similarly, the blinds need to paid in this game as well, just like in Texas Hold’em. The player on the dealer’s left pays the small blind and the player to his left pays the big blind. Badugi is commonly played in limit, pot limit, or half pot limit forms.

The Deal

Each player receives four cards face down, the deal starts with the small blind, goes one by one clockwise until all players receive all four cards. Just like in Hold’em, the player sitting behind the big blind acts first. If he wants to play, either he must call the big blind or raise. The first draw comes after each player had a chance to act.

Each active player can draw up to 4 cards, but if they want, they can stop drawing anytime. After this, there is a round of betting, then the second draw, then another round of betting, and finally the third draw and the last round of betting. If someone called the last raise, then there is a showdown, when the remaining players reveal their cards. The strength of Badugi hands should be checked starting with the highest card so, for example, a 5-6-7-Q (Queen high) beats an A-2-3-K (King high).

Basic Strategy:

It is important to start with three low cards of different suits, because if you do not make a Badugi (4 different suits), and your opponent does not make a Badugi either then the three low cards can win in the end. It is worth playing and drawing with any three cards lower than 7. How high your 4th card should be will depend on the number of opponents, whether they are drawing or not and also you should think about how strong they are once they stand pat. From late position, you should perhaps play with any two cards of different suits that are not higher than 5. Always enter with a raise, and if you have an advantage in the number of cards being drawn (they draw 2, you draw 1) you should always bet.

Euchre Variations – It’s Not Cheating If It’s Part of the Rules

All is fair in love and Euchre.

Euchre is a trump based card game thought to be a derivation of the French card game Ecarte, popularized by the early settlers of Pennsylvania. Since then it has spread to country and worldwide popularity, although it is played most frequently in the Midwestern United States. Euchre is played only with cards nine (9) and higher, resulting in a twenty-four (24) card deck. Euchre places two (2) teams of two (2) persons each against each other, each trying to be the first team to ten (10) points. Trump rotates each hand, along with the deal. It is a fast paced, ever changing game that has so many variations that you would be hard pressed to find two Euchre games that play by the same rules.

Some such variations incorporate rules that otherwise might be perceived from an outsider’s perspective as outright cheating. This article will discuss a few of these variations to show just how fun a game can be with some creativity and open-mindedness.

Stacking the Deck

In Euchre each hand of five (5) cards is dealt in only two (2) rounds, typically dealing clockwise starting with the player to the left of the dealer and dealing two (2) or three (3) cards to each player in the first round and the remaining three (3) or two (2) cards in the second round. This is different than many games where only one (1) card is dealt at a time. This presents a unique opportunity to “stack the deck” and give you or your partner the best cards in the deck (being Jacks and Aces in Euchre).

Although typically frowned upon, some circles consider it perfectly acceptable to stack the deck as long as certain guidelines are met. One typical example is that as long as you offer a player on the other team the right to cut the deck then stacking is tolerated. This means that after shuffling the cards the dealer must present the shuffled cards to a player on the opposing team, who may then split (or “cut”) the deck in two. This is done to prevent stacking the deck.

However, some savvy deck-stackers will anticipate a cut and incorporate that into their shuffling or stacking. Onestrategy to counter this is to cut the deck unusually thick or thin or to simply defer your right to cut the deck (done by simply knocking your hand on top of the shuffled deck).

Stealing the Deal

As with many games, there is a distinct advantage to dealing in Euchre. This is because after the cards are dealt out the dealer will flip over the top card of the remaining undealt cards (there are 24 cards in a euchre deck but only 20 will be dealt to the four players). This card (the “Up Card”) is flipped over for determining Trump. If any player wants the suit of the Up Card to be trump, they must tell the dealer to pick the card up. The dealer then will pick up the card and discard the least desirable card in their hand, thus vastly improving their hand for that particular round.

The strong benefit to dealing has led some circles to incorporate “stealing the deal.” Stealing the deal can be accomplished in many ways, depending on which rules each circle plays under. Some circles again require you to offer a cut to the other team and then either begin dealing the cards out or deal both rounds and flip up the Up Card. Other variations typically incorporate some of the above factors. This move will benefit the team stealing the deal and punish the other team for not paying adequate attention. Either way it is a fun way to mix things up and reward the sneaky and savvy Euchre players.

Renege

Euchre, like many card games, requires each player to follow suit. This means that after the first player to act plays a particular card, each subsequent player must play a card of the same suit as the suit of the card that was led if they hold a card of that suit in their hand. However, there is a strong incentive to not follow that rule if your team stands to lose the round if you follow suit, so many players will instead represent that they do not have a card in that suit and instead use a trump card to win the hand. Whether done intentionally or unintentionally, this is referred to as “reneging” or a “renege.”

Generally speaking this is against the rules in Euchre, but as with many situations in life it isn’t cheating unless you get caught. Depending on the penalties for reneging, it is worth the risk in many players’ eyes. For example, consider the situation where your team stands to lose two (2) points to the other team because you called trump and will not take the necessary three (3) out of five (5) tricks if you follow suit and lose the hand. If the penalty for reneging is only forfeiting the two (2) points for that particular round, it might be good strategy to take the risk and renege (where you will be able to gain the necessary tricks to gain one (1) point).

That covers just a few of the many variations of the card game of Euchre. The countless variations are what make Euchre such an enjoyable game as the rules are constantly changing. Some variations are more wholesome but rules that reward the cunning can be even more fun.

Visit our site to learn more about the exciting, fast paced, ever evolving game of Euchre.